It’s Spring! Take a Day Trip With Us!

A Visit to the Classroom of a Violin Maker There is substantial evidence that the European violin was crafted first in America by the Pueblo peoples and the Hispanic settlers in early 17th century New Mexico. The Franciscan priests and artisans of Mexico in all probability taught Native Americans and New Mexican colonists how to make violins many decades before violin making was introduced to New Englanders, berhaps even before the birth of the most famous makers of 17th century Cremona, Italy. Peter White is the Director of the New Mexico Heritage Project at the University of New Mexico. The New Mexico Musical Heritage Project is a unique studio and classroom environment in which students can learn both the art of playing and the craft of making violins within the rich New Mexican cultural and historical context. Peter White, an English and American Studies professor, folklorist, former UNM administrator, and Director of the New Mexico Heritage Project at UNM is the director of this interdisciplinary program. He is also an American and European-trained violin-maker. In the tradition of many craftsman before him and through the generosity of UNM, its donors, and the State of New Mexico Legislature, he has created a studio and classroom in which to pass his knowledge on to UNM students.

The $69 tuition fee includes instruction, lunch and transportation to and from the classroom. This trip departs from the UNM Continuing Education east parking lot, located at 1634 University Blvd. NE in Albuquerque, NM on Thursday, April 5, 2011 at 9:00am and will return at 2:00pm. For more information visit dce.unm.edu/story-of-new-mexico.htm or call Joan Cok at (505) 277-0563.
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El Morro National Monument and the Wolf SanctuaryA reliable waterhole hidden at the base of a massive sandstone bluff made El Morro (the bluff) a popular campsite. Ancestral Puebloans settled on the mesa top over 700 years ago. Spanish and American travelers rested, drank from the pool and carved their signatures, dates and messages for hundreds of years. Today, El Morro National Monument protects over 2,000 inscriptions and petroglyphs, as well as Ancestral Puebloan ruins. UNM Continuing Education invites you to join us as we discover the rich history of this National Monument. After we visit the monument, we’ll continue on to The Wild Spirit Wolf Sanctuary in Ramah, a “retirement home” for wolves.

The $92 tuition fee includes transportation, entrance fee, guided tour at the wolf sanctuary and a box lunch. This trip departs from the UNM Continuing Education east parking lot, located at 1634 University Blvd. NE in Albuquerque, NM on Saturday, April 28, 2011 at 8:00am and will return at 6:00pm. For more information visit dce.unm.edu/story-of-new-mexico.htm or call Joan Cok at (505) 277-0563.

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1 Response

  1. Yet another interesting chapter in the already interesting story of vioin making across the world

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